Calendar: September 18–24, 2017

Monday, September 18

Prescott Lectures
“The Apotheosis of French Baroque Music” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a five-morning series of lectures exploring the treasures of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s music for the church, the stage and the salon. We will learn how he successfully united the suavity of French music with the rhythmic vitality of Italian music. In addition to being the premier composer of the French baroque, Rameau is, in many ways the father of modern music theory. While we revel in the delights of Rameau’s music, we will also discuss his contributions to the modern understanding of chords and harmony and how these concepts played out in his music. Day 1 will focus on Rameau’s Pièces de Clavecin, his amazing contribution to harpsichord and chamber music.

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com


Tuesday, September 19

Prescott Lectures
“The Apotheosis of French Baroque Music” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a five-morning series of lectures exploring the treasures of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s music for the church, the stage and the salon. We will learn how he successfully united the suavity of French music with the rhythmic vitality of Italian music. In addition to being the premier composer of the French baroque, Rameau is, in many ways the father of modern music theory. While we revel in the delights of Rameau’s music, we will also discuss his contributions to the modern understanding of chords and harmony and how these concepts played out in his music. Day 2 will sample the splendor of Rameau’s church music.

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com


Wednesday, September 20

Prescott Lectures
“The Apotheosis of French Baroque Music” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a five-morning series of lectures exploring the treasures of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s music for the church, the stage and the salon. We will learn how he successfully united the suavity of French music with the rhythmic vitality of Italian music. In addition to being the premier composer of the French baroque, Rameau is, in many ways the father of modern music theory. While we revel in the delights of Rameau’s music, we will also discuss his contributions to the modern understanding of chords and harmony and how these concepts played out in his music. Day 3 will explore the intimate drama of Rameau’s secular cantatas.

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com


Thursday, September 21

Prescott Lectures
“The Apotheosis of French Baroque Music” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a five-morning series of lectures exploring the treasures of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s music for the church, the stage and the salon. We will learn how he successfully united the suavity of French music with the rhythmic vitality of Italian music. In addition to being the premier composer of the French baroque, Rameau is, in many ways the father of modern music theory. While we revel in the delights of Rameau’s music, we will also discuss his contributions to the modern understanding of chords and harmony and how these concepts played out in his music. Day 4 will showcase Rameau’s operas—his crowning achievement.

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com


Friday, September 22

Hillside Club Concert Series
“Italy, 1766: The Tuscan Quartet” The New Esterhazy Quartet (Lisa Weiss and Kati Kyme, violin; Anthony Martin, viola; and William Skeen, cello) open their 11th season with music by Italian composers Boccherini, Cambini, and Nardini, recreating an evening in Tuscany, 1766, when these three played together with famous violinist Manfredi, “the best violinist in all Italy for orchestral and quartet playing,” according to a report by Cambini. The four gifted composers/string players, “The Tuscan Quartet,” were long recognized as the first professional string quartet ever.

8PM
Hillside Club
2286 Cedar Street (at Spruce), Berkeley
$25
Tickets for this Friday concert sold only at the door

Prescott Lectures
“The Apotheosis of French Baroque Music” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a five-morning series of lectures exploring the treasures of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s music for the church, the stage and the salon. We will learn how he successfully united the suavity of French music with the rhythmic vitality of Italian music. In addition to being the premier composer of the French baroque, Rameau is, in many ways the father of modern music theory. While we revel in the delights of Rameau’s music, we will also discuss his contributions to the modern understanding of chords and harmony and how these concepts played out in his music. Day 5 will consider the great composer’s musical legacy.

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com


Saturday, September 23

Episcopal Church of the Incarnation
An evening of baroque chamber music with Natalie Carducci (violin), Gretchen Claassen and Bruno Hurtado Gosalvez (viola da gamba), and Derek Tam (harpsichord). Program to be announced.

7:30 PM
Incarnation Episcopal Church
1750 29th Avenue, San Francisco
Tickets onlne $20 General, $15 Seniors/Students
Information incarnationsf@gmail.com or 415-564-2324

Memorial Concert for Lee McRae
The afternoon will be a celebration and commemoration of Lee McRae’s pioneering work in many areas of education, music, and social activism. These include Lee’s lifelong work for peace, and the teaching of non-violence, especially to children; her co-founding of Berkeley’s Walden School, whose focus is on non-violence and the creative arts; her participation in the development of SFEMS and the Berkeley Festival; her work helping establish Philhamonia Baroque Orchestra; her founding of the Singers’ Retreat and SFEMS Music Discovery Workshop; her projects with the Viola da Gamba Society and Early Music America; and her work as an artist manager for such notables as Frans Brüggen, Gustav Leonhardt, and Anner Bylsma. Read more about Lee’s remarkable life and work here.

Among the many musical contributors to the concert will be Lee’s medieval choir, Coro Ciconia, under the direction of Asher Davison, who will sing selections from Ockeghem’s Missa pro defunctis. Harry Gray, music teacher from the Walden School, will honor Lee by leading the school’s children in a work by Frances Blaker. Both the Instrumental and Vocal Collegium students from the Music Discovery Workshop and Youth Collegium will participate. There will be performances by William Mahrt and the Singers’ Retreat, a gamba consort, and a recorder quartet featuring Vicky Beckman, Melissa Cocco, Eva Legêne, and Astrid Andersson (Eva’s daughter who knew Lee for many years). Other performers will include harpsichordists Yuko Tanaka and Hanneke Van Proosdij, gambist Lynn Tetenbaum, flutist Kathleen Kraft, and violinist Lisa Grodin.

2–5 PM
St. John’s Presbyterian Church
2727 College Avenue, Berkeley
Admission is free.
All are welcome.

New Esterházy Quartet
“Italy, 1766: The Tuscan Quartet” The New Esterhazy Quartet (Lisa Weiss and Kati Kyme, violin; Anthony Martin, viola; and William Skeen, cello) open their 11th season with music by Italian composers Boccherini, Cambini, and Nardini, recreating an evening in Tuscany, 1766, when these three played together with famous violinist Manfredi, “the best violinist in all Italy for orchestral and quartet playing,” according to a report by Cambini. The four gifted composers/string players, “The Tuscan Quartet,” were long recognized as the first professional string quartet ever.

4PM
St. Mark’s Lutheran Church
1111 O’Farrell Street, San Francisco
$30 (discounts for SFEMS members, seniors, and students)
415-520-0611 www.newesterhazy.org


Sunday, September 24

New Esterházy Quartet
“Italy, 1766: The Tuscan Quartet” The New Esterhazy Quartet (Lisa Weiss and Kati Kyme, violin; Anthony Martin, viola; and William Skeen, cello) open their 11th season with music by Italian composers Boccherini, Cambini, and Nardini, recreating an evening in Tuscany, 1766, when these three played together with famous violinist Manfredi, “the best violinist in all Italy for orchestral and quartet playing,” according to a report by Cambini. The four gifted composers/string players, “The Tuscan Quartet,” were long recognized as the first professional string quartet ever.

4PM
All Saints’ Episcopal Church,
555 Waverley Street (at Hamilton), Palo Alto
$30 (discounts for SFEMS members, seniors, and students)
415-520-0611 www.newesterhazy.org

San Francisco Conservatory of Music
Eva Legêne and Astrid Andersson, recorders, Elisabeth Reed, viola da gamba and Corey Jamason, harpsichord, perform Music of F. Couperin, Bavet, Telemann, and Roger.

2 PM
San Francisco Conservatory of Music, Sol Joseph Recital Hall
50 Oak Street, San Francisco
Free admission
www.sfcm.edu

SF Music Day 2017
San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music presents the 10th annual SF Music Day, featuring 35 ensembles (155 musicians) on 4 stages. SF Music Day is one of the Bay Area’s top free music festivals, located in downtown San Francisco. It celebrates the diverse and dynamic music of our region, from string quartets to jazz combos, traditional chamber groups to new music pioneers, Bay Area musicians dedicated to exploring the traditional Western canon, or steeped in the sounds of India, Latin America and the Philippines. Early music ensembles MUSA, Musica Pacifica, and the Sylvestris Quartet will be among the featured groups.

Noon to 8 PM
War Memorial Veterans Building
401 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco
Schedule: www.sffcm.org/concerts/sfmusic-day/schedule
Information: info@sffcm.org

Continue reading next week’s calendar . . .