Calendar: August 28–September 3, 2017

Wednesday, August 30

Barefoot Chamber Concerts presents the New Esterházy Quartet
“A Tale of Two Cities in Three Concerts” The New Esterházy Quartet (Lisa Weiss, Kati Kyme, Anthony Martin, and William Skeen) perform a series of 3 short concerts within five days. Each concert has one of Papa Haydn’s “Paris” Symphonies (Nos. 82–87) and one of his “London” Symphonies (Nos. 93–104), all from contemporaneously published arrangements for string quartet either by Haydn himself or overseen by him. Readings from Charles Dickens shed light on the differences between those cities, at least in Dickens’ eyes, and highlight the music.
Haydn worked for 30 years for the Esterházy family and was obliged to remain with them at all times, even when they traveled. He even had to wear livery! For most of this time everything he wrote was, by the terms of his contract, the property of the Esterházy family. However, in 1779 he renegotiated his contract and was finally able to accept commissions from outside, and even more significant, in 1790 he was allowed to travel on his own. The “Paris” symphonies and the “London” symphonies were the fruits of this late-life liberation, and they reflected the awe and respect due to Haydn by the international musical establishment. They were commissioned by and played for his admirers in these cities, to which he was now allowed to travel, to huge acclaim wherever he went.
Concert 1: Symphonies in E flat, Nos. 84 (Paris) and 99 (London)

6:30 PM
Hillside Community Swedenborgian Church
1422 Navellier Street, El Cerrito
Buy Tickets here – $25 (or at the door)
Special price for all 3 concerts Buy Tickets here – $50 (or at the door)


Friday, September 1

Barefoot Chamber Concerts presents the New Esterházy Quartet
“A Tale of Two Cities in Three Concerts” The New Esterházy Quartet (Lisa Weiss, Kati Kyme, Anthony Martin, and William Skeen) perform a series of 3 short concerts within five days. Each concert has one of Papa Haydn’s “Paris” Symphonies (Nos. 82–87) and one of his “London” Symphonies (Nos. 93–104), all from contemporaneously published arrangements for string quartet either by Haydn himself or overseen by him. Readings from Charles Dickens shed light on the differences between those cities, at least in Dickens’ eyes, and highlight the music.
Haydn worked for 30 years for the Esterházy family and was obliged to remain with them at all times, even when they traveled. He even had to wear livery! For most of this time everything he wrote was, by the terms of his contract, the property of the Esterházy family. However, in 1779 he renegotiated his contract and was finally able to accept commissions from outside, and even more significant, in 1790 he was allowed to travel on his own. The “Paris” symphonies and the “London” symphonies were the fruits of this late-life liberation, and they reflected the awe and respect due to Haydn by the international musical establishment. They were commissioned by and played for his admirers in these cities, to which he was now allowed to travel, to huge acclaim wherever he went.
Concert 2: Symphonies in B flat, Nos. 102 (London) and 85 (Paris)

6:30 PM
Hillside Community Swedenborgian Church
1422 Navellier Street, El Cerrito
Buy Tickets here – $25 (or at the door)
Special price for all 3 concerts Buy Tickets here – $50 (or at the door)


Sunday, September 3

Barefoot Chamber Concerts presents the New Esterházy Quartet
“A Tale of Two Cities in Three Concerts” The New Esterházy Quartet (Lisa Weiss, Kati Kyme, Anthony Martin, and William Skeen) perform a series of 3 short concerts within five days. Each concert has one of Papa Haydn’s “Paris” Symphonies (Nos. 82–87) and one of his “London” Symphonies (Nos. 93–104), all from contemporaneously published arrangements for string quartet either by Haydn himself or overseen by him. Readings from Charles Dickens shed light on the differences between those cities, at least in Dickens’ eyes, and highlight the music.
Haydn worked for 30 years for the Esterházy family and was obliged to remain with them at all times, even when they traveled. He even had to wear livery! For most of this time everything he wrote was, by the terms of his contract, the property of the Esterházy family. However, in 1779 he renegotiated his contract and was finally able to accept commissions from outside, and even more significant, in 1790 he was allowed to travel on his own. The “Paris” symphonies and the “London” symphonies were the fruits of this late-life liberation, and they reflected the awe and respect due to Haydn by the international musical establishment. They were commissioned by and played for his admirers in these cities, to which he was now allowed to travel, to huge acclaim wherever he went.
Concert 3: Symphonies in D, Nos. 86 (Paris) and 104 (“The London Symphony”)

5 PM
Hillside Community Swedenborgian Church
1422 Navellier Street, El Cerrito
Buy Tickets here – $25 (or at the door)
Special price for all 3 concerts Buy Tickets here – $50 (or at the door)

Continue reading next week’s calendar . . .