Calendar: May 1–7, 2017

Monday, May 1

Prescott Lectures
John Prescott
“Mozart’s Grand Tour.” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a series lectures exploring on the musical experiences of the young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart during his grand tour as a wunderkind, from 1763–66. Perhaps the most well-known aspect of Mozart’s life and career is his status as a child prodigy. Before the age of ten, young Mozart accompanied his father and sister, “Nannerl” (Maria Anna), and who was 5 years his senior, on the first of two grand tours of Europe. The purpose from the point of view of the Mozart family was to exhibit the great talent of the Mozart children to the musical world. However, the other wonderful effect of these travels was to expose Mozart to music he never would have encountered if he had remained at home. No previous musical experience necessary. Day 1: “Musical life in Paris.”

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com


Tuesday, May 2

Sacramento Recorder Society
Regular meeting for recorder players, with guest conductor Shira Kammen. Newcomers welcome. Bring recorders, stand, and other early instruments. Music provided. Refreshments.

6:45–9:30 PM
Friends Meeting House
890 57th St., between H and J, Sacramento.
sacrecorders.wordpress.com

 

Prescott Lectures
John Prescott
“Mozart’s Grand Tour.” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a series lectures exploring on the musical experiences of the young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart during his grand tour as a wunderkind, from 1763–66. Perhaps the most well-known aspect of Mozart’s life and career is his status as a child prodigy. Before the age of ten, young Mozart accompanied his father and sister, “Nannerl” (Maria Anna), and who was 5 years his senior, on the first of two grand tours of Europe. The purpose from the point of view of the Mozart family was to exhibit the great talent of the Mozart children to the musical world. However, the other wonderful effect of these travels was to expose Mozart to music he never would have encountered if he had remained at home. No previous musical experience necessary. Day 2: “Mozart’s musical experience of London.”

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com


Wednesday, May 3

Prescott Lectures
John Prescott
“Mozart’s Grand Tour.” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a series lectures exploring on the musical experiences of the young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart during his grand tour as a wunderkind, from 1763–66. Perhaps the most well-known aspect of Mozart’s life and career is his status as a child prodigy. Before the age of ten, young Mozart accompanied his father and sister, “Nannerl” (Maria Anna), and who was 5 years his senior, on the first of two grand tours of Europe. The purpose from the point of view of the Mozart family was to exhibit the great talent of the Mozart children to the musical world. However, the other wonderful effect of these travels was to expose Mozart to music he never would have encountered if he had remained at home. No previous musical experience necessary. Day 3: “Music in Germany and the Low Countries.”

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com


Thursday, May 4

Prescott Lectures
John Prescott
“Mozart’s Grand Tour.” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a series lectures exploring on the musical experiences of the young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart during his grand tour as a wunderkind, from 1763–66. Perhaps the most well-known aspect of Mozart’s life and career is his status as a child prodigy. Before the age of ten, young Mozart accompanied his father and sister, “Nannerl” (Maria Anna), and who was 5 years his senior, on the first of two grand tours of Europe. The purpose from the point of view of the Mozart family was to exhibit the great talent of the Mozart children to the musical world. However, the other wonderful effect of these travels was to expose Mozart to music he never would have encountered if he had remained at home. No previous musical experience necessary. Day 4: “Italy, where Mozart learned about opera.”

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com


Friday, May 5

American Bach Soloists, Jeffrey Thomas, Conductor
George Frideric Handel, La Resurrezione. Composed and first performed during his youthful sojourn in Rome, Handel’s 1708 work is a marvel of creative power and imagination. La Resurrezione, a truly operatic oratorio, scandalized the Vatican (opera was prohibited in Rome by Papal edict at the time) yet assured Handel’s place as the new master of Italian operatic style. Heaven and Hell—embodied in Lucifer and an Angel—battle for supremacy on earth through this dramatic telling of the emotions and convictions of Mary Magdalene, Mary Cleophas, and John the Evangelist. The score demands bravura performances from singers and instrumentalists alike. Jeffrey Thomas conducts an outstanding cast of leading Handelians in this early example of the composer’s brilliance. With soloists soprano Nola Richardson as Mary Magdalene, soprano Mary Wilson as The Angel, mezzo-soprano Meg Bragle as Mary Cleophas, tenor Kyle Stegall as John the Evangelist, and baritone Jesse Blumberg as Lucifer.

8 PM
St. Stephen’s Church,
3 Bay View, Belvedere
$33–$85
Tickets online

East Bay Chapter, ARS
Monthly playing session with guest conductor Louise Carslake. New members and guests welcome.

7:30–10 PM
Zion Lutheran Church
5201 Park Blvd., Oakland
http://www.symbolicsolutions.com/ebrs-web2015/index.html

 

Prescott Lectures
John Prescott
“Mozart’s Grand Tour.” John Prescott, Ph.D., presents a series lectures exploring on the musical experiences of the young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart during his grand tour as a wunderkind, from 1763–66. Perhaps the most well-known aspect of Mozart’s life and career is his status as a child prodigy. Before the age of ten, young Mozart accompanied his father and sister, “Nannerl” (Maria Anna), and who was 5 years his senior, on the first of two grand tours of Europe. The purpose from the point of view of the Mozart family was to exhibit the great talent of the Mozart children to the musical world. However, the other wonderful effect of these travels was to expose Mozart to music he never would have encountered if he had remained at home. No previous musical experience necessary. Day 4: “Mozart’s musical response to his travels.”

9:30 AM to Noon
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St., Berkeley
$30/$25 per session, $125/$110 full week
suzannesiebert@gmail.com

San Francisco Bach Choir, Magen Solomon, Director
“Hidden Classical Jewels” Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Vespers (de Confessore), K.339; and Ludwig van Beethoven Mass in C, Op. 86. A rare treat: two great Classical composers, two neglected choral gems. Hear these works of genius performed (for the first time in local memory) with a Classical-instrument orchestra. Though written just 27 years apart, these composers’ sound-worlds are radically different. Mozart’s gorgeous Vespers is full of soaring melodies, clear colors, and lyrical solo writing (including the famous “Laudate Dominum” soprano solo). In contrast, Beethoven’s Mass in C, with its powerful orchestra, daring harmonies, and vigorous choruses, foreshadows the drama of his Ninth Symphony. With soloists Rita Lilly, soprano; Heidi Waterman, mezzo soprano; John St. Marie, tenor; Matt Hanscom, bass; and the Jubilate Orchestra playing Classical-era instruments.

7:30 PM
First Unitarian Universalist Church
1187 Franklin St (at Geary), San Francisco
Tickets online  $30/$25/$10
855-4SF BACH, boxoffice@sfbach.org


Saturday, May 6

American Bach Soloists, Jeffrey Thomas, Conductor
George Frideric Handel, La Resurrezione. Composed and first performed during his youthful sojourn in Rome, Handel’s 1708 work is a marvel of creative power and imagination. La Resurrezione, a truly operatic oratorio, scandalized the Vatican (opera was prohibited in Rome by Papal edict at the time) yet assured Handel’s place as the new master of Italian operatic style. Heaven and Hell—embodied in Lucifer and an Angel—battle for supremacy on earth through this dramatic telling of the emotions and convictions of Mary Magdalene, Mary Cleophas, and John the Evangelist. The score demands bravura performances from singers and instrumentalists alike. Jeffrey Thomas conducts an outstanding cast of leading Handelians in this early example of the composer’s brilliance. With soloists soprano Nola Richardson as Mary Magdalene, soprano Mary Wilson as The Angel, mezzo-soprano Meg Bragle as Mary Cleophas, tenor Kyle Stegall as John the Evangelist, and baritone Jesse Blumberg as Lucifer.

8 PM
First Presbyterian Church,
2407 Dana St., Berkeley
$33–$85
Tickets online

Ronald Brautigam, Fortepiano
Renowned Dutch pianist Ronald Brautigam returns to the Bay Area to perform an all-Beethoven recital. For this exclusive performance, Mr. Brautigam will be performing on the 1823 Broadwood & Sons grand fortepiano that is owned by the Ira F. Brilliant Center for Beethoven Studies at San Jose State University, and which is a favorite instrument of Mr. Brautigam and many other artists. This fortepiano is similar to Beethoven’s own Broadwood from 1817. The program will include three piano sonatas, numbers 1, 15 (Pastoral), and 21 (Waldstein), and seven bagatelles (short pieces, op.33). Brautigam’s dynamic program covers Beethoven’s early period to the start of his “heroic” middle period with the masterpiece Waldstein Sonata.

2 PM
Tateuchi Hall, Finn Center, Community School of Music and Art
230 San Antonio Circle (off San Antonio Road), Mountain View.
First-time visitors to the Center are encouraged to arrive early.
Tickets $20 to $55, with special $100 packages that include a post-concert reception with the opportunity to meet Mr. Brautigam.Due to limited seating, please purchase tickets in advance.
408-808-2058 or www.americanbeethovensociety.org

Foothill Community Concert Series presents Flauti Diversi
“The Nightingale in Love: French Music of the 18th Century” Frances Feldon, recorder and traverso; David Morris, viola da gamba; and Katherine Heater, harpsichord and chamber organ, perform music by Boismortier, both Couperins, and Marais. Flauti Diversi has been presenting early/contemporary chamber music programs for over twenty years.

7:30 PM
Foothill Presbyterian Church
5301 McKee Road, San Jose
$15
Tickets online or at the door

Mid-Peninsula Recorder Orchestra, Frederic Palmer, Director
Spring concert, featuring an antiphonal motet by Melchior Franck, three settings of the Renaissance melody, Fortuna Desperata, an instrumental arrangement of the popular French song La Mer with Jay Kreuzer, harmonica, and Vivaldi’s Concerto RV 531 with Gregor Dairaghi and Hilary Port soloists.

2 PM
Trinity Presbyterian Church
1106 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Carlos
Free
http://mpro-online.org/ or 650-591-3648


Sunday, May 7

American Bach Soloists, Jeffrey Thomas, Conductor
George Frideric Handel, La Resurrezione. Composed and first performed during his youthful sojourn in Rome, Handel’s 1708 work is a marvel of creative power and imagination. La Resurrezione, a truly operatic oratorio, scandalized the Vatican (opera was prohibited in Rome by Papal edict at the time) yet assured Handel’s place as the new master of Italian operatic style. Heaven and Hell—embodied in Lucifer and an Angel—battle for supremacy on earth through this dramatic telling of the emotions and convictions of Mary Magdalene, Mary Cleophas, and John the Evangelist. The score demands bravura performances from singers and instrumentalists alike. Jeffrey Thomas conducts an outstanding cast of leading Handelians in this early example of the composer’s brilliance. With soloists soprano Nola Richardson as Mary Magdalene, soprano Mary Wilson as The Angel, mezzo-soprano Meg Bragle as Mary Cleophas, tenor Kyle Stegall as John the Evangelist, and baritone Jesse Blumberg as Lucifer.

4 PM
St. Mark’s Lutheran Church,
1111 O’Farrell (at Gough), San Francisco
$33–$85
Tickets online

Ronald Brautigam Masterclass

Pianist and fortepianist Ronald Brautigam gives a masterclass in which he will work with the finalists of the 31st Young Pianists Beethoven Competition.

2:30–4:30 PM
Concert Hall, San Jose State University (S. 7th St.)
Free to the Public
Information: 408-808-2056 or Eric.Gjovaag@sjsu.edu

 

San Francisco Bach Choir, Magen Solomon, Director
“Hidden Classical Jewels” Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Vespers (de Confessore), K.339; and Ludwig van Beethoven Mass in C, Op. 86. A rare treat: two great Classical composers, two neglected choral gems. Hear these works of genius performed (for the first time in local memory) with a Classical-instrument orchestra. Though written just 27 years apart, these composers’ sound-worlds are radically different. Mozart’s gorgeous Vespers is full of soaring melodies, clear colors, and lyrical solo writing (including the famous “Laudate Dominum” soprano solo). In contrast, Beethoven’s Mass in C, with its powerful orchestra, daring harmonies, and vigorous choruses, foreshadows the drama of his Ninth Symphony. With soloists Rita Lilly, soprano; Heidi Waterman, mezzo soprano; John St. Marie, tenor; Matt Hanscom, bass; and the Jubilate Orchestra playing Classical-era instruments.

4 PM
First Unitarian Universalist Church
1187 Franklin St (at Geary), San Francisco
Tickets online $30/$25/$10
855-4SF BACH, boxoffice@sfbach.org

Davis High School Baroque Ensemble, Angelo Moreno, Director
Featuring Violin and Viola D’Amore Soloist, Rachel Barton Pine playing works by Vivaldi, Bach and Locatelli.
Pre-concert lecture by Rachel Barton at 7:30 PM.

8 PM
Richard Brunelle Performance Hall
Davis Senior High School
315 W. 14th Street, Davis, CA 95616
ADMISSION: Free
VIP reserved seating available and entrance to after party reception with Rachel Barton Pine for $75.00.
Please contact Kristi Gladding at klglad@pacbell.net for reservation requests. Donations accepted at the door

Continue reading next week’s calendar . . .